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Terms and Definistions

The academic year usually begins late August.

A semester means a period of approximately fourteen consecutive weeks (twelve teaching weeks of classes, one week study break and one week for examinations) during which the College is in regular session.   The Fall Semester usually begins in late August, or early September, the Winter Semester in early January and the Spring Semester in late April or early May.

A course is a unit of work in a particular subject normally extending through one semester, the completion of which normally carries credit towards the fulfillment of the requirements of certain degrees, diplomas or certificates.

A credit hour is the measure used to reflect the relative weight of a given course towards the fulfillment of an appropriate degree, diploma, certificate, major, minor or other program requirements.  Normally a course has a credit value of three-credit-hours for courses designated as degree courses (M.Div., M.T.S., B.Th.).  In the case of the Associate in Theology, courses are of a two-credit-hour value.  Students may complete three-credit-hour courses in order to fulfill the Associate in Theology requirement, but two-credit-hour courses are not acceptable in a Master’s degree program.  Normally, certificates are made up of six credit-hours from two three- credit-hour courses which are linked and designated as part of the certificate program.  A weight of one credit-hour normally means that the course meets for classes one hour per week for the duration of a semester (or two hours per week for the duration of a semester in the case of a two-credit-hour course).  The number of hours of required instruction outside of class time, such as tutorials, etc., may not impact on the number of credit hours assigned to a particular course and academic units.

Queen’s College courses are designated with the alphabetic character ‘Q’ in the course numbering. Three-credit-hour courses in the College’s degree programs begin at 3000 and extend to 3999.   Two-credit-hour courses begin at 2000 and extend to 2999.

A program is a series of courses, the completion of which, if other requirements are met, qualifies the candidate for a degree, diploma or certificate.

A full-time student is any student who is registered with Queen’s College for at least four three-credit-hour courses per semester, and who is admitted into a degree program (M.Div., M.T.S. or B.Th., B.Th. by Distance).  In the Associate in Theology program a student enrolled in five courses per semester is considered full-time.

A part-time student is any student who is registered with Queen=s College for three three-credit-hour courses or less and who is admitted into a degree program (M.Div, M.T.S. or B.Th., B.Th. by Distance).  In the Associate in Theology program a student enrolled in four courses or fewer courses per semester is considered part-time.

M. Div. is the nomenclature for the Master of Divinity degree. This is normally a three-year program of full-time study.

M.T.S. is the nomenclature for the Master of Theological Studies degree.  This is normally a two-year program of full-time study.

M.Th. is the nomenclature for the Master of Theology degree.  This is normally a one year program of full-time study following the completion of a B.Th. or a B.Th. by Distance program.

  1. Th. is the nomenclature for the Bachelor of Theology degree. This is normally a three-year program of full-time study.
  2. Th. by Distance is the nomenclature for the Bachelor of Theology by Distance degree. This program is offered both on campus and in a distance format.

A.Th. is the nomenclature for the Associate in Theology diploma.  This program of study is ten (two-credit-hour) courses completed on-site, by correspondence and/or online.

Diploma in Theology and Ministry is normally a three-year program of study which includes eight weekend sessions per year.

A Certificate in Youth Ministry is made up of five two-credit-hour courses in Youth Ministry studies.

A prospective postulant is a person who is sponsored by a diocesan bishop to attend an Advisory Committee on Postulants for Ordination (A.C.P.O.) assessment conference.

A postulant is a person who has been accepted by a diocesan bishop for training possibly leading to ordination.

An ordinand is a postulant who has satisfied the requirements for candidacy for ordination and licensing by a diocesan bishop.

The Advisory Committee on Postulants for Ordination (A.C.P.O.) operates a national discernment process which is advisory to bishops in the Anglican Church of Canada.  A.C.P.O. evaluates persons seeking acceptance as postulants for ordination to the priesthood in the Anglican Church of Canada.  Responsibilities of A.C.P.O. include:

evaluation in the areas of spirituality and church life, pastoral and social concern and personal characteristics
screening around issues of power, trust and sexual misconduct
identifying areas for growth
offering advice regarding the pursuit of other forms of ministry.

Normally, a prospective postulant will participate in an A.C.P.O. conference prior to pursuing theological studies.

Sponsorship is normally the official support for specific training from the recognized authoritive church body

A Vocational Development Seminar is a unit of work extending over a semester in which students are introduced to subjects relevant to their personal and vocational growth.

Supervised Practice of Ministry (S.P.M.) (Clinical Placement) is a locally developed theological education program based on an adult learning model which enables participants to grow in their effectiveness as pastoral care givers.  It is open to women and men of any religious affiliation who have a commitment to personal and spiritual growth and the development of clinical knowledge and skills in spiritual care giving.  It has three inter-related purposes:

  • to help the pastoral person understand who he or she is in relationship with others
  • to teach skills of Pastoral Care, and
  • to reflect theologically about human life.

Clinical Pastoral Education (C.P.E.) is an internationally accredited and recognized program offered by the Canadian Association for Pastoral Practice and Education (C.A.P.P.E.)

The Fall Gathering constitutes the first week of the Fall semester and begins the process of community formation. All students are encouraged to attend the Fall Gathering.  For all prospective postulants, postulants and ordinands attendance is compulsory.

Parish and Community Placements are requirements for students in the M.Div, B.Th. and B.Th by Distance programs. This is in addition to the prescribed course of study, and includes both assigned Sunday duty in parishes in St. John’s and the surrounding area and a venue of social outreach within the community.

Faculty Advisors are assigned to all students in any degree program at the beginning of each semester. It is the responsibility of students to consult regularly regarding academic and vocational development with their Faculty Advisor.