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    Associate in Theology

    General Information

    The Associate in Theology (A.Th.) program is a course of study designed for persons who are interested in increasing their knowledge and appreciation of Christian belief and practice.  As well as developing their pastoral skills, this program also provides a theological base for persons assuming leadership and ministry within the life of their faith community.

    The Associate in Theology requires that a student normally complete ten two-credit-hour courses.  These courses may be taken on a full-time or a part-time basis, but all requirements for the Associate must normally be fulfilled within seven years from the date of initial registration.  Students may complete their ten courses on site at Queen’s College, by correspondence, or a combination thereof, in accordance with program requirements. The Associate in Theology constitutes a complete program in itself, but students may also build on the Associate to use it toward the degree of Bachelor of Theology by Distance. (For further information, see pp. 40-41).

    Since September 2005, Queen’s College has also offered Youth Ministry courses that can be used toward  a major in the A.Th. Program, or a Certificate in Youth Ministry. (For further information, see p. 61)

    There are six disciplines:

    • Biblical Studies (i.e., Old Testament, New Testament)
    • Ethics
    • Historical Studies
    • Liturgical Studies (i.e. Liturgy, Homiletics)
    • Pastoral Studies (i.e., Pastoral Care, Pastoral Counseling, Christian Education)
    • Theological Studies
    • Youth and Young Adult Ministry Studies

    The A.Th. curriculum requires:

    • 2 courses in Biblical Studies (Introduction to the Old Testament and Introduction to the New Testament)
    • 1 course in Church History
    • 1 course in Ethics
    • 1 course in Theological Studies
    • 1 course in Pastoral Studies
    • 1 course in Liturgical Studies
    • 3 electives as needed
    • Four courses in one of the following: Pastoral Studies, Biblical Studies, or Youth Ministry Studies, which will constitute a major,
    • Two courses in one other discipline which will constitute a minor,

    In order to qualify for the A.Th., the candidate must:

    1. maintain a minimum average of 65% with no mark below 60% in all courses so graded,
    2. complete all requirements for this program normally within seven years from the date of initial registration.

    Advanced Standing for Graduates of Diploma in Theology and Ministry in Associate in Theology Program

    Students who have completed the Diploma in Theology and Ministry may request Advanced Standing for four Associate in Theology courses. The Advance Standing courses replace the electives in the requirements. The Advanced Standing from the Diploma in Theology and Ministry Program will count as the Major in Pastoral Studies.

    Entrance Requirements

    The minimum academic entrance requirement for this program is a high school diploma or its equivalent. However, post-secondary education is desirable.

    In addition to the above academic requirements, participants should also demonstrate:

    • Commitment to relating the Gospel to their lives.
    • Experience, or willingness to serve in ministry.
    • Desire and the ability to grow emotionally, spiritually, and intellectually.
    • Commitment to participate fully in the program.

    Applicants must also submit the following documentation with an application form which can be obtained from the Queen’s College General Office or on our web site at queenscollegenl.ca

    A personal statement outlining your educational background

    • Family and work history
    • Ministry involvements
    • Participation in any personal growth and ministry training events
    • Reasons for applying to this program
    • Expectations about how this program will help you in your future ministry

    A letter (or letters) of reference from your local parish, congregation or Church agency (preferably ordained minister) stating that: you have been expected to be involved in its life and ministry, and that

    • You work well with others
    • You have the ability and the commitment to complete this program
    • Your participation in this program will enhance the ministry of your faith community

    Regulations Governing the Associate in Theology

    Applicants should normally register for courses six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester (i.e. September, January).  Late registrations will be considered, depending on circumstances.

    Two-credit-hour courses qualify for the Associate in Theology, Bachelor of Theology by Distance, and Certificate in Youth Ministry Programs, and are identified as such.  Students also may apply three-credit- hour courses to fulfill the qualifications of the A.Th. program.

    Most courses require written assignments and/or a final examination.

    All examinations (with the exception of take-home/mail-in exams) must be written under the supervision of an invigilator. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange for an invigilator in accordance with the regulations governing exam invigilation as set out in the Queen’s College Calendar.

    Courses are to be completed within a single academic semester.  Please consult Queen’s College Academic Regulations governing aegrotat standing, late assignments, and incomplete grades.  Students should also consult the Queen’s College Calendar for regulations governing grading of courses, language, plagiarism, and required withdrawal and readmission.

    The tuition cost for all courses is published before the academic year begins.  Students are eligible for a discount under specified conditions.  Queen’s College courses are not offered with a waiver of tuition fees for senior citizens.  Students should consult the Queen’s College Calendar for regulations governing tuition refunds.

    The withdrawal policy concerning academic prejudice follows the policies outlined under Academic Regulations of the current Queen’s College Calendar.

    Normally a maximum of two courses from external institutions may be transferred towards the Associate in Theology.  The external institutions are normally member schools of the Association of Theological Schools in Canada and the United States.

    Additional policies governing the College’s academic programs are applicable to the Associate in Theology and are contained in the current calendar.  Applicants may also wish to consult the College’s website for further information.

    Students seeking any changes or amendments to the qualifications (noted above) must do so by writing to the Provost for permission.

    Exam Invigilation Policy

    Some correspondence midterms and/or final exams must be written under the supervision of an invigilator. It is the responsibility of the correspondence student to arrange an invigilator for her/his examination in accordance with the criteria for invigilators specified by Queen’s College.

    The Invigilator Agreement Form must be completed by all students. A separate form is required for each exam, each semester. It must be submitted to the instructor as soon as possible upon registration for a course in any given semester. It is the right of the College to contact the invigilator and/or to refuse any invigilator it deems inappropriate.

    Criteria for selecting an invigilator

    An invigilator must be a member of one of the following groups:

    • member of the clergy (any denomination)
    • faculty member, administrator or other professional staff member of a university, college, or primary/secondary school (professor, principal, teacher, etc.)
    • member of the a health care profession (medical doctor, dentist, chiropractor, optometrist, pharmacist, veterinarian, registered nurse, social worker, etc.)
    • member of the legal profession (judge, magistrate, lawyer, notary public, police officer)
    • postmaster
    • professional accountant

    An invigilator must not be:

    • a member of the student’s family
    • a member of the same household
    • a student registered in the Associate Program at Queen’s College

    Invigilator Responsibilities

    It is the responsibility of the invigilator to:

    • supervise the exam, free of charge, for the Associate student at a time and place mutually acceptable to the invigilator and the student
    • provide an appropriate testing environment (i.e., quiet, free of other persons as well as notes and books unless otherwise specified by the instructor)
    • advise student on matters pertaining to the examination procedure, but not on matters pertaining to course or exam content
    • secure all examination material before and after the examination date
    • return the written examination and any pertinent material promptly to Queen’s College in the envelope provided
    • ensure that the student does not leave the examination area until the examination is completed and remain with the student for the duration of the examination (with the exception of an emergency in which case the invigilator shall use her/his own discretion and note the same to the instructor on the sheet provided)
    • ensure that the student and the invigilator signs the verification form contained in the examination package that is sent directly to the invigilator

    Course Descriptions

    Biblical Studies

    Old Testament

    This course provides an overview of the Old Testament. The purpose is two-fold. The first is to familiarize students with the content, historical context and theology of the Old Testament. The second is to introduce students to certain methodologies and resources that help us to understand and interpret the Old Testament. No previous scriptural study is expected or required.

    A study of many of the prophets of the Old Testament. The course examines the political, economic, and religious context in which each prophet lived as well as how these factors shaped the prophet’s message. Special attention is given to certain elements of theology – in particular, the image or understanding of God that is suggested by the prophet’s words and writings.  (Prerequisite: 2000-Q Introduction to the Old Testament)

    New Testament

    This course offers an overview of the New Testament, and has two aims. The first is to familiarize students with the content, historical context and theology of the New Testament, with an emphasis on the four gospels and the Pauline letters. The second is to introduce students to certain methodologies or reading strategies that help us to understand and interpret the New Testament. No previous scriptural study is expected or required.

    This course provides an introductory overview of the life and teachings of Jesus as presented in the gospels. The aim of the course is three-fold: (1) to examine specific aspects of the life of Jesus including the birth narratives, parables, miracles, preaching, passion, etc.; (2) to introduce students to the portraits of Jesus that have emerged over the centuries; (3) and to grapple with our old and new images to form our own portrait of Jesus. (Prerequisite: 2000-Q Introduction to the New Testament)

    This course provides an introductory overview of the Gospel of John. Having examined the pertinent introductory issues, special emphasis will be given to major themes such as Signs, Christology, Johannine-Synoptic Relationships, Eschatology, Duality, Discipleship, Symbolism and Faith

    This course provides an introduction to the Pauline Corpus. It is designed to equip students with background information on the world in which Paul lived, and to examine the major issues and themes of Paul’s letters.

    Intertestamental

    This course will explore the lives, roles and contributions of women from the early Greek period to the early Roman Empire.  Special attention will be given to women in the Old and New Testaments.  (cross-listed with 2110-Q Historical Studies)

    This course will examine the themes and stylistic features of the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke by applying the methodological tools of source and redaction criticism.  Through the implementation of these methodological tools students will see for themselves the uniqueness of each gospel and their distinct portrayal of Jesus and the gospel message.

    Church History

    This course provides a survey of the history of the Christian Church from its Jewish roots to the dawn of the Reformation.  It is divided into three periods:  (1) The Early Church, (2) The Imperial Church, and (3) Medieval Christianity.  Our goal is to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the cultural, institutional, theological and historical factors that have shaped Christianity.

    This course surveys some of the main historical and theological developments in the Christian Church from the Reformation to the 21st Century. (cross-listed as 2505-Q)

    This course will explore the lives, roles and contributions of women from the early Greek period to the early Roman Empire.  Special attention will be given to women in the Old and New Testaments. (cross-listed with 2310-Q Biblical Studies)

    Pastoral Studies

    A two-semester program designed to introduce students to the theology, theory and skills essential to pastoral ministry. There will be some emphasis on the personal and interpersonal matters that are essential to effective pastoral ministry. These courses are particularly geared for individuals interested in pastoral ministry to the sick. (Part A is a prerequisite for Part B)

    This course provides an excellent opportunity for parents, educators, catechists, Sunday School teachers and clergy to explore how they can best encourage adults and children to grow in faith.  Three faculty members, with specialties in education, worship, spirituality and theology, will help participants explore the connections between how we teach, what we believe and how we worship.

    This course is arranged to provide an historical and theological overview of the diaconate as an Order of Ministry within the Church. The course will explain the connection between permanent diaconate and transitional diaconate. It will examine the uniqueness of diaconate and the potential of the vocational diaconal ministry to enhance and empower lay ministries.

    This course is intended to introduce students to the concept of grief and bereavement. It will help them discover the individual and relational dynamics of grief, and recognize grief as a major source of stress. It will help develop an understanding of family-systems theory as a resource in pastoral ministry and situate grief and bereavement in the context of one’s faith journey and faith tradition.

    This course examines the individual and relational dynamics at play in marriages and families. Students develop an understanding of family-systems theories as a resource in pastoral ministry. There is a consideration of mixed marriage, human sexuality, parenting, same-sex relationships and marriage-family involvement. Participants will recognize the importance of ministry to married people and families.

    Celebrating the communion of science and faith, this course explores the promise of evolutionary Christian spirituality.  We will examine the case from the perspective of over a dozen leading theologians and progressive thinkers.

    Christian Education

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the philosophy, theology, and practice of youth ministry with a special emphasis on building community and developing student leaders. (cross-listed with 2915-Q Youth Ministry Studies)

    This course examines the deeply felt need of many Christians for growth in faith and spirituality. It also provides the framework for the local Church to assist individuals and congregations in this growth. This course is designed to be of value to individuals in their personal faith journey as well as assisting local faith communities in meeting the spiritual needs of their adult members.

    Explores creative spirituality from a number of perspectives and world views, with a view towards defining what makes spirituality Christian.

    The course will examine a model of evangelization and catechesis (Christian Education) that has (1) separate and combined educational elements for the adult and youth faith communities and (2) an approach for bringing both together in a ministry of service.(cross-listed with 2944- Youth Ministry Studies)

    As you can tell by the title this course acknowledges the changing landscape of education in the church. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of Christian education in the context of youth ministry. Topics to be discussed include programs, developmental psychology, faith development, catechesis, and Bible teaching.  (cross-listed with 2945-Q Youth Ministry Studies)

    Theological Studies

    Thinking Through the Faith is an introduction to basic topics in Christian theology. The course will examine such topics as revelation, creation, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, salvation, prayer, the Church and spirituality, and will provide the student with a method for thinking theologically about contemporary issues affecting both the world and the individual.   (Prerequisite: 2000-Q Introduction to the Old Testament or 2200-Q Introduction to the New Testament)

    This course surveys some of the main historical and theological developments in the Christian Church from the Reformation to the 21th Century. (cross-listed with Church History 2105-Q)

    This two-credit-course equips students with fundamentals for the study of theology. It will expose them to essential skills such as basic logic, critical thinking, distributed learning and on-line research. The skills will be acquired while exploring basic philosophical and theological concepts and producing papers that demonstrate a grasp of the concepts and use of the skills.

    Moral Theology

    This course includes an examination of the foundations of Christian ethics and the influence of ethics on individuals, communities and society. It is an exploration of ethics in theory and in practice.

    Liturgical Studies

    This introductory course explores the rich depth and diverse foundations in Christian Literature through an exploration of different liturgical themes as they have evolved over two millennia.

    Introduction to the Eucharist.  This course attempts to introduce students to the Sacrament of the Eucharist as liturgical theology.  It hopes to deepen students’ awareness of the Eucharist as the prayer of the community.  Using a models approach to the Eucharist, we will weave together biblical, ritual, historical and theological dimensions

    The goal of this course is to develop a realistic, holistic, and practical approach to worship as an integral part of a healthy Christian community. This course will focus on developing theoretical and practical ministry skills in areas such as spiritual disciplines, sacraments, music, and retreats.  (cross-listed with 2925-Q Youth Ministry Studies)

    This course introduces students to the three sacraments of initiation, namely baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist.  The course will weave together the biblical, ritual, historical and theological dimensions together  and  hopes to deepen student’s awareness of the history, theology and practice of these rites in the public prayer of the Church.

    This course will provide an introduction to the field of homiletics. Students will develop the necessary skills for biblical preaching and will exercise these skills in both classroom and chapel settings.

    Youth Ministry Studies

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the philosophy, theology, and practice of youth ministry with a special emphasis on building community and developing student leaders. (cross-listed with 2415-Q Pastoral Studies)

    The goal of this course is to develop a realistic, holistic, and practical approach to worship as an integral part of a healthy Christian community. This course will focus on developing theoretical and practical ministry skills in areas such as spiritual disciplines, sacraments, music, and retreats.  (cross-listed with 2825-Q Liturgical Studies)

    This course will examine the theology of service and social justice and provide practical approaches, strategies, and skills for getting youth involved as part of a Christian community.  (cross-listed with 2635-Q Moral Theology)

    The course will examine a model of evangelization and catechesis (Christian Education) that has (1) separate and combined educational elements for the adult and youth faith communities and (2) an approach for bringing both together in a ministry of service.  (cross-listed with 2444-Q Pastoral Studies)

    As you can tell by the title this course acknowledges the changing landscape of education in the church. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of Christian education in the context of youth ministry. Topics to be discussed include programs, developmental psychology, faith development, catechesis, and Bible teaching.  (cross-listed with 2445-Q Pastoral Studies)

    This course will explore evangelism and discipleship within youth ministry while seeking to cast a contemporary vision for both evangelism and discipleship within the larger Christian community. Topics to be discussed include student mentorship, small group ministry, youth retreats, homiletics/preaching, creative evangelism.